Impermanence – The simple reason you shouldn’t spend time being angry

You or your emotions – who is in charge?

Doing what I do, I get to talk to a lot of emotional people. People whose stress is manifesting itself in extreme emotions and they don’t know what to do with it and how to come out of it. And common amongst those I’ve helped in this area is that they have little concept of impermanence.

Because when you think you have unlimited time, you have the freedom to sustain rage or wallow in self-pity.
But if you think you may die tomorrow, what you spend the next hour, or even second doing becomes an important decision. But don’t waste the time on deciding either!

A person who accepts the fragility of life doesn’t take chances in saying things they’ll have to apologise for—because they know they might not get to.

There are many reasons to be a calm and kind person, but perhaps the best one might be the fact that this could be your very last opportunity.

And so I say to them “Do the kind thing now – not tomorrow. Don’t hang onto destructive emotions a second longer than you need to, because you might miss the chance to do something brilliant one last time.”

Life is impermanent but this moment isn’t. I plan to spend it doing something awesome. We don’t have the luxury of doing anything else.

This succinct statement from Marcus is a potent, striking reminder of flux, impermanence. Everything is constantly changing; all things will fall away in time. Thus, to expect things to stay the same is to set ourselves up for immense suffering. By accepting impermanence, we render ourselves much more capable of flowing with the tides of fate, and we become much more appreciative for our present blessings and loved ones, understanding that they will eventually fade away. Thus, contemplating impermanence—or imagining the loss of things we hold dear, as the Stoics did—is a profoundly powerful practice for reducing our own suffering and increasing our joy and appreciation for the present
This succinct statement from Marcus Aurelius is a potent, striking reminder of flux, impermanence. Everything is constantly changing; all things will fall away in time. Thus, to expect things to stay the same is to set ourselves up for immense suffering. By accepting impermanence, we render ourselves much more capable of flowing with the tides of fate, and we become much more appreciative for our present blessings and loved ones, understanding that they will eventually fade away. Thus, contemplating impermanence—or imagining the loss of things we hold dear, as the Stoics did—is a profoundly powerful practice for reducing our own suffering and increasing our joy and appreciation for the present

Matt

Experienced business leader, mentor and coach, with fascinations for technology, psychology and ancient philosophies. A self-confessed techno hippy with a unique talent for bringing the best out in people.

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